Patrick Goh, Faculty, Department of Sociology, UH Mānoa

Patrick Goh

Assistant Professor
Office: TBD
Telephone: TBD
Email: pgoh@hawaii.edu


Browse My Publications:

Background

Originally from Los Angeles, I have several places in the world that I think of as “home,” including Fullerton CA, San Diego CA, Lexington KY, Chicago IL, Utrecht Netherlands, and now Mānoa Hawaiʻi. Living in these places, I have fostered a respect for people’s common and unique cultural experiences, along with an intrigue in how such experiences contribute to how we perceive the world and our role within it. Relatedly, I’m fascinated by the challenge of understanding the nature of mental illness, and clinical psychology has provided me with the opportunity to directly pursue this understanding and use it in the therapy room to better people’s lives. In addition to being passionate about mentorship, I enjoy trying new types of coffee, traveling, and losing to my wife at board games.

Education

  • PhD, Clinical Psychology, University of Kentucky, 2022
  • MA, Psychology, San Diego State University, 2016
  • BS, Psychology, University of California San Diego, 2011

Courses

  • PSY 671: Introduction to Assessment I
  • PSY 672: Introduction to Assessment II
  • PSY 676: Psychopathology

Research

My research aims to inform the development of screening tools that identify those at risk for ADHD-related outcomes. To date, this has involved: (1) using advanced statistics to identify core symptoms of ADHD for predicting future impairment, (2) isolating cognitive and affective risk markers’ roles in explaining ADHD phenotypes, and synthesizing these two lines of research, (3) incorporating symptom-level analysis and examination of risk markers to clarify multiple pathways underlying ADHD’s common comorbidities. Looking forward, I plan to leverage my findings to develop transdiagnostic screeners designed for primary care and school settings while also exploring how cultural factors and systemic injustices may impact how ADHD should best be screened for in understudied AANHPI communities.